MarineBio Conservation SocietySea Life News   :: ScienceDaily

Coastal waters are unexpected hotspots for nitrogen fixation

Thu, 21 Feb 2019 11:05:03 EST ~ Nitrogen fixation is surprisingly high in the ocean's coastal waters and may play a larger role than expected in carbon dioxide uptake, a new study shows. The findings -- based on thousands of samples collected in the western North Atlantic -- upend prevailing theories about where and when nitrogen fixation occurs, and underscore the need for scientists to revisit the global distribution of marine nitrogen fixation and reevaluate its role in the coastal carbon cycle. Find out more...

How coral bleaching threatens Caribbean communities

Thu, 21 Feb 2019 11:04:25 EST ~ A new study uses environmental, socioeconomic and management data from 30 Caribbean islands to identify which communities may be most at risk from the social and ecological effects of coral bleaching, which occurs when warm water causes coral polyps to expel algae living in their tissue. The analysis shows that independent island nations, such as Cuba and Jamaica, may be less vulnerable to coral bleaching than island territories like Saint Barthlemy. Find out more...

How to save a seabird

Thu, 21 Feb 2019 11:04:02 EST ~ A new study outlines more than a decade of success in reducing seabird bycatch in Alaska's longline fisheries, and where there's still room for improvement. Find out more...

Researchers discover a flipping crab feeding on methane seeps

Wed, 20 Feb 2019 13:35:39 EST ~ Researchers have documented a group of tanner crabs vigorously feeding at a methane seep on the seafloor off British Columbia -- one of the first times a commercially harvested species has been seen using this energy source. Find out more...

Antibiotic resistances spread faster than thought, aquaculture study reveals

Tue, 19 Feb 2019 17:01:08 EST ~ By studying fish raised in aquaculture, researchers have shed new light on the mechanisms by which antibiotic resistance genes are transferred between bacteria. According to their study, those mechanisms are more varied than previously thought. Find out more...

Fishing and pollution regulations don't help corals cope with climate change

Tue, 19 Feb 2019 11:18:25 EST ~ A new study reports that protecting coral reefs from fishing and pollution does not help coral populations cope with climate change. The study also concludes that ocean warming is the primary cause of the global decline of reef-building corals and that the only effective solution is to immediately and drastically reduce greenhouse gas emissions. Find out more...

Why North Carolinian boats are fishing off New Jersey's coast, and how a CSF might help

Tue, 19 Feb 2019 11:18:22 EST ~ By studying the logbooks of fishing boats, researchers found that some fishing boats travel more than 250 miles to catch the fish that used to be in local waters. In response, researchers began investigating how local community supported fishery programs -- like farm shares for fish -- can affect fishing communities. That resulted in the creation of Fishadelphia, a CSF based in a South Philadelphia charter school. Find out more...

Ocean acidification harms cod larvae more than previously thought

Tue, 19 Feb 2019 11:17:23 EST ~ The Atlantic cod is one of the most important commercial fish species in the world. Recent studies have shown that ocean acidification threatens the early life stages of this species. So far it was hoped that at least the larvae that survive might be more robust and therefore may aid in the adaptation of this population. A new article suggests otherwise. Find out more...

20-million-year-old tusked sea cow is Central America's oldest marine mammal

Tue, 19 Feb 2019 11:17:20 EST ~ A researcher searching the shoreline of the Panama Canal for fossil plants instead found an ancient sea cow. An 'emergency fossil excavation' due to rising water levels yielded a remarkably complete skeleton of a new genus and species of dugong, estimated to be about 20 million years old, the first evidence of a marine mammal from the Pacific side of the canal. Find out more...

Total synthesis of marine antitumor agents trabectedin and lurbinectedin

Tue, 19 Feb 2019 11:16:59 EST ~ With its vast numbers of different lifeforms, the sea is a largely unexplored source of natural products that could be starting points for new pharmaceuticals, such as the antitumor drugs trabectedin and lurbinectedin. Because only tiny amounts can be obtained from sea organisms, synthetic production is necessary. Scientists have introduced a new, efficient synthetic route for these two drugs. A key step is the light-controlled activation of a carbon-hydrogen bond. Find out more...